Process

The Nightly News

Behind the scenes of The Nightly News in London in 2022. We called the space the Tarkovsky Box because it dripped with rain like Stalker.

Process

Gods

“Being an agnostic means all things are possible, even God… This world is so strange that anything may happen, or may not happen. Being an agnostic makes me live in a larger, a more fantastic kind of world, almost uncanny. It makes me more tolerant.”

Jorge Luis Borges

Process

After the End

Photo by James Reeves
Photo by Walter Wlodarczyk

Behind the scenes of After the End at Green-Wood Cemetery in Brooklyn, New York in 2021. James and I were miffed by the seams in the altar, so we decided to seal them with caulk and paint. The altar could potentially collapse under substantial weight, so I slithered onto it like Mission Impossible as everyone watched with bated breath. It worked out.

People often asked us how we got responses to the center of the altar. A very unfancy four-foot-long grabber tool.

Process

Emotional Granularity

“Emotional granularity isn’t just about having a rich vocabulary; it’s about experiencing the world, and yourself, more precisely… According to a collection of studies, finely grained, unpleasant feelings allow people to be more agile at regulating their emotions, less likely to drink excessively when stressed, and less likely to retaliate aggressively against someone who has hurt them… It gives your brain more precise tools for handling the myriad challenges that life throws at you.”

Lisa Feldman Barrett 

Process

God Stamps

Process

Deconstruction

Process

Koans for 2020

Process

Lighting for the Nocturnal

Korpo, Finland

In the nearby city of Turku, grids of these now-secular Swedish Advent candelabras line the windows of apartments and office buildings alike, casting a meditative and communal mood on the streets like a temple.

Process

Light the Barricades

First sketch

Behind the scenes of Light the Barricades in Los Angeles in 2019. When it traveled to Charlotte, the Doubt lightbox happened to stand in the backdrop of a wedding ceremony. They covered the word.