News
Public Art

Candy Chang created a new participatory public installation called A Monument for the Anxious and Hopeful at The Rubin Museum of Art in New York, NY, on view through 2018 (February 2018 to January 7, 2019). As part of their year-long exhibition on the theme of the future, this collaboration with James A. Reeves is a living catalogue of the ways in which we relate to the uncertainty of tomorrow. More here.

Feb 10 - Nov 11, 2018
Exhibition

Candy Chang’s Before I Die installation is featured in the exhibition No Spectators: The Art of Burning Man at the Smithsonian American Art Museum’s Renwick Gallery in Washington, D.C. From March 30, 2018 to January 21, 2019, visitors will be able to participate in the project in a gallery room which will feature Before I Die on all four walls. More info here.

March 30, 2018 - January 21, 2019
Upcoming Lectures
March 5, 2019
International Interior Design Association RISE Conference
Seattle, WA
April 12, 2019
Central Michigan University 4th Annual Diversity and Inclusion Symposium
Mount Pleasant, MI | more
April 16, 2019
TECH Conference
Jackson, MS
April 27, 2019
Rubin Museum of Art Panel Talk: The Powers of Hope and Anxiety
New York, NY | more
3-4:30pm
May 7, 2019
FPA Retreat
La Jolla, CA
Press
Before I Die is merely one of the most creative community projects ever.” —The Atlantic
“Do you embrace your doubts and nervous thoughts? Or tuck them away? For artist Candy Chang, these emotions are material. Her public art works are internationally renowned for their vulnerability and interactivity… From public displays of anonymously submitted secrets to collecting a community's dreams and aspirations for their built environment to encouraging others to cry in public, Chang's emotionally driven projects prove we may have more in common with our neighbors than we think.” —Forbes
“Candy Chang’s work at the intersection of public art, community engagement, and urban design touches on every aspect of art’s role in society and contributes to meaningful placemaking in our communities.” —Public Art Review